Cricket

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FTJT

Well-Known Radge
Cricket is one of those pleasant little exceptions where there's not really any inner turmoil involved in cheering on an England side, so I get to talk about Ben Stokes and the summer of 2019 with delight rather than chin-stroking appreciation. Not quite Hibsing the cup final but still.

That being said, I do struggle a little more with IT20. Too much power hitting. Domestic games have a bit less of a talent concentration, so there's still a central role for nudging and nurdling at a run a ball for long stretches, and attacking a bowler feels riskier, like more of a tactical choice. And the longer formats are obviously just better.

For the cricket skeptics I'd suggest listening to Tests as a strictly background pursuit - having TMS on at work, or sky on in the background while you're doing the ironing or whatever, and just letting your focus drift towards it now and then as your own interest and events dictate. It's not really a format you can just stare at until you become interested, but when you find yourself on its frequency there's nothing in sport that's better or more absorbing.
 

Jack

Aulder Than The Internet This Radge
I played cricket for a while after I retired from playing football. Some will say I never played either!

I found it a good game to play and got a wee bit involved with tactics but normally left that to those who knew what they were doing.

The social side was good, very good, with many an evening spent getting a wee bit tipsy and the tours, the north and south of Scotland and deep into England, were great fun.

I canny watch it though.
 

joethehibby

Well-Known Radge
Thread starter
Cricket is one of those pleasant little exceptions where there's not really any inner turmoil involved in cheering on an England side, so I get to talk about Ben Stokes and the summer of 2019 with delight rather than chin-stroking appreciation. Not quite Hibsing the cup final but still.

That being said, I do struggle a little more with IT20. Too much power hitting. Domestic games have a bit less of a talent concentration, so there's still a central role for nudging and nurdling at a run a ball for long stretches, and attacking a bowler feels riskier, like more of a tactical choice. And the longer formats are obviously just better.

For the cricket skeptics I'd suggest listening to Tests as a strictly background pursuit - having TMS on at work, or sky on in the background while you're doing the ironing or whatever, and just letting your focus drift towards it now and then as your own interest and events dictate. It's not really a format you can just stare at until you become interested, but when you find yourself on its frequency there's nothing in sport that's better or more absorbing.
I enjoyed stokes getting smashed about the ground , not a fan 😩🤣
 

Stu

Maple Leaf Radge
For the cricket skeptics I'd suggest listening to Tests as a strictly background pursuit - having TMS on at work, or sky on in the background while you're doing the ironing or whatever, and just letting your focus drift towards it now and then as your own interest and events dictate. It's not really a format you can just stare at until you become interested, but when you find yourself on its frequency there's nothing in sport that's better or more absorbing.
Absolutely agree about Test Match Special. Cricket is one of the few sports that can be appreciated more on the radio than televised in my opinion. One thing cricket did always have over football was it's literature too. Although I'm much more a football man I've always felt the writing around it has largely been quite mediocre with a few exceptions. There has been some fantastic writing on the cricket over the years by some brilliant authors and journalists. Going back over the generations the game had people such as Neville Cardus, John Arlott and Edinburgh-born R. C Robertson-Glasgow. The latter was a great wit who wrote in the same manner. An ex-player with Somerset, he became known as 'Crusoe' by other players. The nickmame came about after he'd taken the wicket of an Essex batsman who was heard to say, 'I was bowled by an old cnut I thought I thought had died two thousand years ago, called fcuking Robinson-Crusoe.'

For commentary, I was always a massive admirer of Richie Benaud with only good old Bill McLaren being his equal I felt, irrespective of the sports they commentated on. An on-field accident where Richie as a young guy got smacked in the mouth full on by a ball when batting was always evident with his great gleaming set of false gnashers.

There were quite a few amusing stories when I was at Trent Bridge back then. Being on the staff I had duties in helping look after the pitch and stadium. Recall one idyllic and sunny afternoon there where I had the regular duty of driving the diesel roller up and down, up and down the wicket for a couple of hours in the hot sun with a cold one under the seat. There were a few first team players practicing out on the pitch and Derek Randall came striding over with that agricultural gait and begged me 'giz a go youth'. I jumped down and he got on and roared off with a head of steam. Unfortunately, he'd forgotten to ask where the brake was, couldn't stop and smashed the heavy roller straight through the pavillion fence into the seats before scampering off.

What a great laugh Derek Randall was. The players and staff called him 'Arkle' after the famous racehorse becuase he was so quick over the pitch. In benefit games he would come into his own, standing teetering comically under a prospective catch from a towering shot that seemed to be coming down from the clouds. At the last minute he'd lean forwards and catch it with both hands behind his back. Other times a batsman would take a full-blooded blistering drive in his direction cloe up in the field. Arriving around waist height, he'd catch it with one hand and slip it in his trouser pocket in one movement with no one, including the umpires knowing where the ball was. A lovely working class bloke with a very ordinary backgroundand a massive natural talent
 

Weehibbydrew

Mussel-bound Radge
Absolutely agree about Test Match Special. Cricket is one of the few sports that can be appreciated more on the radio than televised in my opinion. One thing cricket did always have over football was it's literature too. Although I'm much more a football man I've always felt the writing around it has largely been quite mediocre with a few exceptions. There has been some fantastic writing on the cricket over the years by some brilliant authors and journalists. Going back over the generations the game had people such as Neville Cardus, John Arlott and Edinburgh-born R. C Robertson-Glasgow. The latter was a great wit who wrote in the same manner. An ex-player with Somerset, he became known as 'Crusoe' by other players. The nickmame came about after he'd taken the wicket of an Essex batsman who was heard to say, 'I was bowled by an old cnut I thought I thought had died two thousand years ago, called fcuking Robinson-Crusoe.'

For commentary, I was always a massive admirer of Richie Benaud with only good old Bill McLaren being his equal I felt, irrespective of the sports they commentated on. An on-field accident where Richie as a young guy got smacked in the mouth full on by a ball when batting was always evident with his great gleaming set of false gnashers.

There were quite a few amusing stories when I was at Trent Bridge back then. Being on the staff I had duties in helping look after the pitch and stadium. Recall one idyllic and sunny afternoon there where I had the regular duty of driving the diesel roller up and down, up and down the wicket for a couple of hours in the hot sun with a cold one under the seat. There were a few first team players practicing out on the pitch and Derek Randall came striding over with that agricultural gait and begged me 'giz a go youth'. I jumped down and he got on and roared off with a head of steam. Unfortunately, he'd forgotten to ask where the brake was, couldn't stop and smashed the heavy roller straight through the pavillion fence into the seats before scampering off.

What a great laugh Derek Randall was. The players and staff called him 'Arkle' after the famous racehorse becuase he was so quick over the pitch. In benefit games he would come into his own, standing teetering comically under a prospective catch from a towering shot that seemed to be coming down from the clouds. At the last minute he'd lean forwards and catch it with both hands behind his back. Other times a batsman would take a full-blooded blistering drive in his direction cloe up in the field. Arriving around waist height, he'd catch it with one hand and slip it in his trouser pocket in one movement with no one, including the umpires knowing where the ball was. A lovely working class bloke with a very ordinary backgroundand a massive natural talent
Lovely stuff, thanks for these tales.
 

AG1337

Well-Known Radge
Cricket is a ridiculously tricky game to play. Bowling straight is infuriatingly difficult to master and hitting the ball is harder than it looks.
The worst thing about catching the ball is it is so hard it hurts your hands.

I only played a few of times and was significantly well below average as a player but strangely I did enjoy it. As mentioned previously, the social part is decent too.

Scotland playing cricket seems like Jamaica trying their hand at bobsleigh. No disrespect to Scottish cricketers and fans intended.
 

moathibby

Legendary Radge
Scotland being beaten by a team whose country is run by a regime which makes the Tories look like far left Liberals. Where we see a report on the BBC that a great deal of their populace are now starving to death.Something not right there.
 

joethehibby

Well-Known Radge
Thread starter
Absolutely agree about Test Match Special. Cricket is one of the few sports that can be appreciated more on the radio than televised in my opinion. One thing cricket did always have over football was it's literature too. Although I'm much more a football man I've always felt the writing around it has largely been quite mediocre with a few exceptions. There has been some fantastic writing on the cricket over the years by some brilliant authors and journalists. Going back over the generations the game had people such as Neville Cardus, John Arlott and Edinburgh-born R. C Robertson-Glasgow. The latter was a great wit who wrote in the same manner. An ex-player with Somerset, he became known as 'Crusoe' by other players. The nickmame came about after he'd taken the wicket of an Essex batsman who was heard to say, 'I was bowled by an old cnut I thought I thought had died two thousand years ago, called fcuking Robinson-Crusoe.'

For commentary, I was always a massive admirer of Richie Benaud with only good old Bill McLaren being his equal I felt, irrespective of the sports they commentated on. An on-field accident where Richie as a young guy got smacked in the mouth full on by a ball when batting was always evident with his great gleaming set of false gnashers.

There were quite a few amusing stories when I was at Trent Bridge back then. Being on the staff I had duties in helping look after the pitch and stadium. Recall one idyllic and sunny afternoon there where I had the regular duty of driving the diesel roller up and down, up and down the wicket for a couple of hours in the hot sun with a cold one under the seat. There were a few first team players practicing out on the pitch and Derek Randall came striding over with that agricultural gait and begged me 'giz a go youth'. I jumped down and he got on and roared off with a head of steam. Unfortunately, he'd forgotten to ask where the brake was, couldn't stop and smashed the heavy roller straight through the pavillion fence into the seats before scampering off.

What a great laugh Derek Randall was. The players and staff called him 'Arkle' after the famous racehorse becuase he was so quick over the pitch. In benefit games he would come into his own, standing teetering comically under a prospective catch from a towering shot that seemed to be coming down from the clouds. At the last minute he'd lean forwards and catch it with both hands behind his back. Other times a batsman would take a full-blooded blistering drive in his direction cloe up in the field. Arriving around waist height, he'd catch it with one hand and slip it in his trouser pocket in one movement with no one, including the umpires knowing where the ball was. A lovely working class bloke with a very ordinary backgroundand a massive natural talent
Was randall not the cricket equivilant of benny brazil 🤣
 

Stu

Maple Leaf Radge
Was randall not the cricket equivilant of benny brazil 🤣
Haha, I can see why you'd say that! I'd say think more, George Best - maybe picking up that can of beer flung at him by a Hun and drinking it. Or maybe a Russell Latapy.

He was always originally a number three batsman - traditionally often the best batsman in the side - but also played four and five.

Old videos of him are well worth a watch, especially for those that think cricket a bit staid and dull. You'll likely see a few histrionics and fidgeting at the crease. Maybe the odd cartwheel in the field too! He certainly was unique.

One of his finest hours was in the Centenary Test against Australia where he absolutely destroyed the great Dennis Lillee with Dennis getting more and more furious with him. Ballsy as well, taking a really nasty one on the napper and jumping straight up.

 

joethehibby

Well-Known Radge
Thread starter
Watching the windies , never thought about their dugshite colour , suppose it’s not their fault 😩🤣
 

HenryLB

Donator
Absolutely agree about Test Match Special. Cricket is one of the few sports that can be appreciated more on the radio than televised in my opinion. One thing cricket did always have over football was it's literature too. Although I'm much more a football man I've always felt the writing around it has largely been quite mediocre with a few exceptions. There has been some fantastic writing on the cricket over the years by some brilliant authors and journalists. Going back over the generations the game had people such as Neville Cardus, John Arlott and Edinburgh-born R. C Robertson-Glasgow. The latter was a great wit who wrote in the same manner. An ex-player with Somerset, he became known as 'Crusoe' by other players. The nickmame came about after he'd taken the wicket of an Essex batsman who was heard to say, 'I was bowled by an old cnut I thought I thought had died two thousand years ago, called fcuking Robinson-Crusoe.'

For commentary, I was always a massive admirer of Richie Benaud with only good old Bill McLaren being his equal I felt, irrespective of the sports they commentated on. An on-field accident where Richie as a young guy got smacked in the mouth full on by a ball when batting was always evident with his great gleaming set of false gnashers.

There were quite a few amusing stories when I was at Trent Bridge back then. Being on the staff I had duties in helping look after the pitch and stadium. Recall one idyllic and sunny afternoon there where I had the regular duty of driving the diesel roller up and down, up and down the wicket for a couple of hours in the hot sun with a cold one under the seat. There were a few first team players practicing out on the pitch and Derek Randall came striding over with that agricultural gait and begged me 'giz a go youth'. I jumped down and he got on and roared off with a head of steam. Unfortunately, he'd forgotten to ask where the brake was, couldn't stop and smashed the heavy roller straight through the pavillion fence into the seats before scampering off.

What a great laugh Derek Randall was. The players and staff called him 'Arkle' after the famous racehorse becuase he was so quick over the pitch. In benefit games he would come into his own, standing teetering comically under a prospective catch from a towering shot that seemed to be coming down from the clouds. At the last minute he'd lean forwards and catch it with both hands behind his back. Other times a batsman would take a full-blooded blistering drive in his direction cloe up in the field. Arriving around waist height, he'd catch it with one hand and slip it in his trouser pocket in one movement with no one, including the umpires knowing where the ball was. A lovely working class bloke with a very ordinary backgroundand a massive natural talent

Loving the tales! Would be great to hear more if you feel like writing them down :)
 

HenryLB

Donator
Cheers Henry, would be happy to as long as it's not boring anyone!

Can't speak for others but they don't have to read! For me it's very much the reverse.

I also used to open the batting, albeit at a VERY different level to you for what was basically a London pub team. I obviously don't have anything like the anecdotes you do (Gary Sobers, incredible!) but I did find myself playing against the NZ all rounder Chris Cairns once. His team mate Hamish Marshall opened the batting for our opposition - his previous knock had yielded 160* against Australia - and we managed to get Hamish out for thirty odd, unbelievably.

Cairns then hit something like nine sixes off our two best bowlers including one straight one which hit half way up a massive tree about twenty yards over the boundary. We didn't think we were in the game, particularly, when they finished on 320-ish, but it was quite chastening to be swept out for about 75. especially as Cairns decided to only bowl off spin :)
 

tayside hibee

Well-Known Radge
27 years ago, my local in a smallish village was inhabited by many “ English settlers” 😜. I became friendly with many of them, and they would watch the cricket, much to my taunts. Over time they introduced me to the finer points of the game , and I then viewed it in a different light.

Ive never been to a test match, but can see the attraction , of sitting with many a beer , over many a hour , in the pleasant sun, with a few mates, talking the talk and occasionally paying attention to what’s going on . 😂
 

HenryLB

Donator
27 years ago, my local in a smallish village was inhabited by many “ English settlers” 😜. I became friendly with many of them, and they would watch the cricket, much to my taunts. Over time they introduced me to the finer points of the game , and I then viewed it in a different light.

Ive never been to a test match, but can see the attraction , of sitting with many a beer , over many a hour , in the pleasant sun, with a few mates, talking the talk and occasionally paying attention to what’s going on . 😂

Going to a test can be one of the best ways to spend a day. I think the mistake people sometimes make is to think it'll deliver the same kind of experience as football. If you go expecting non-stop action you'll be disappointed, but give it the right kind of attention and a whole landscape reveals itself, an ebb and flow that's sometimes - yes - quite boring (and to which you can pay only cursory attention and concentrate on drinking and chatting) but occasionally electrifyingly exciting. Often because the boring bit has built up the game to a tremendous point of tension.

The one thing I do find funny is when people say it's a soft, effete kind of game. Face a bit of proper fast bowling and then try to claim that! Years ago I had a Scottish flatmate in London (who I'm still v friendly with) who constantly ribbed us in a good natured way about cricket being easy and for weaklings etc. We still call him Sanjay after a legendary night watching England play India where, with almost no knowledge of the game whatsoever, and a huge bag of cans, he cheered India relentlessly to a very exciting win.

Anyway, he came with us to a net once at the Oval. We stuck him in against a couple of pretty easy medium pace bowlers and he never said it was a soft game again.
 

Stu

Maple Leaf Radge
Will respond to these interesting posts later but in the meantime...

Just thinking back to some of the players who were around at that time in the 1970s and the good few I managed to talk to in some capacity, often on duty on match days.

Those match days were purely fantastic for me, I loved cricket in those days and so working at Trent Bridge on a Saturday at time-and-a-half or double pay on a Sunday were my idea of heaven. I’d probably have been there paying to watch anyway, if I wasn’t playing myself.

Maybe one or two of the cricket fans might know about the rules governing the roller. During the match, the captain of the side batting can request the rolling of the pitch (the actual wicket) for a period of up to seven minutes before the start of an innings and before start of play after the first day. There were two rollers, heavy and light. The heavy roller was a large sit-on roller, I mentioned earlier, whilst the light roller was the kind of familiar hand-pulled thing you might see on someone’s lawn back in the day. The head groundsman detailed me the regular job of seeking out the captain, on the pitch or in the pavilion and asking would he like the heavy or the light roller. It was pretty much a formality with 99.9% of the time the heavy one being chosen.

This was my cue to talk to many famous international cricketers although as a kid I was pretty much terrified of these larger-than-life, legendary figures. Maybe the largest in size was the great Clive Lloyd of Lancashire and who became captain of the West Indies. A huge man but one who loped around the pitch like a lithe big cat. Certainly, one of the best and most agile fielders ever. So, quaking a bit, I ran out on to the pitch and asked him ‘which roller, Mr Lloyd?’ ‘It’s kind of you to ask young man, the heavy roller please, what’s your name?’ ‘Stuart’. ‘Well thank you Stuart’.

Clive Lloyd was captain of a wonderful West Indies side at the time, a great world star, and a great gentleman too. Each time that Lancashire or the Windies came to Trent Bridge subsequently he would greet me by my name. Me, a snot-nosed teenager with scruffy work jeans on. He was a gem of a man with the humble touch. I had huge admiration for.

Contrast that with the undoubtedly most hated player in cricket at that time (and probably ever). I wonder if you can guess?

Yes, Geoffrey Boycott. What a total fcuking obnoxious arsehole. The lads on the staff detested him and would do anything not to have to speak to him. He was ignorant, rude and dismissive, apart from having a massive ego. Probably the most selfish player ever too. I recall going out on to the pitch at the end of a session and asking him which roller he would like on the wicket. The answer was ‘give me the fucking heavy roller and make sure it’s the full fucking seven minutes’. This to a sixteen year-old kid.

Not one other captain spoke to me like that and they numbered some huge names in the game, apart from our own great Sir Garfield Sobers there was, Ray Illingworth, Tony Greig (who at a height of 6ft 6ins’ would turn up at the ground in his 1960s BMC Mini), Australian captain, Ian Chappell and Mike Denness of Kent who became England captain. Mike was originally from Bellshill and I had family there so he would always have a chat. A lovely man.

On Test Match days in particular at Trent Bridge there were always a lot of celebrities around and I got to meet one or two of them. My favourite was John Le Mesurier – Sgt Wilson of Dad’s Army – who was a great cricket fan. I’ll maybe save that chat for another time.
 
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