Cricket

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Stu

Maple Leaf Radge
I don't follow the game much these days but played as an opening batsman and was actually on the books at Trent Bridge as a youngster. Clearly, the shorter versions of the game had to come, that's the world we live in where everything has to be instant gratification and 'now'. Like football, it often reflects society as a whole.

I enjoyed watching a bit of the televised The Hundred games. Lots of hyping up but good to see the way it brings interest for kids and the whole family. Evening T20 games are a bit of a drinkathon but that's fine, they have atmosphere. For me though I was brought up with Test Cricket and the County game. Longer versions of the game where you really see the full range of skills, the tactics and the strategies. I'd liken it in some ways to the difference between chess and drafts. I liked the traditional skills such as an opening bat 'getting his eye in' against the quick bowlers and taking the shine off the ball.

When the longer game was fashionable you'd see openers showing the full face of the bat to the ball for a while, aiming to hit everything straight between mid-on and mid-off for a while initially. They'd often cut loose later and show a full array of strokes, when set. In the short game they just have to throw the bat at everything, cross-batted 'silly' strokes from the first ball. But then they're mainly facing medium-pace trundlers anyway. The game has dumbed down greatly but it's fun and it really had to happen to save the future of the sport.
 
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Two Headed Boy

Well-Known Radge
My English bosses were asking if I was excited about this on my Zoom the other day, and I had no idea.

I lived in Leeds for a bit and one of my flats backed on to Headingly Stadium and still never caught the cricket bug. The only thing I ever went to see the there was the European heats for World's Strongest Man. The Scottish guy was total pish and quit half way through in the huff after dropping a shield on his foot.

I did like the cricket crowd in the summer when I was in the loo with the window cracked open though. If you timed it right, getting a polite round of applause from a few thousand folk after a successful splash down was quite satisfying.
 

Weehibbydrew

Mussel-bound Radge
My English bosses were asking if I was excited about this on my Zoom the other day, and I had no idea.

I lived in Leeds for a bit and one of my flats backed on to Headingly Stadium and still never caught the cricket bug. The only thing I ever went to see the there was the European heats for World's Strongest Man. The Scottish guy was total pish and quit half way through in the huff after dropping a shield on his foot.

I did like the cricket crowd in the summer when I was in the loo with the window cracked open though. If you timed it right, getting a polite round of applause from a few thousand folk after a successful splash down was quite satisfying.
The Western Terrace at Headingley on a Saturday afternoon is as rowdy as many football terraces
 

Hibee Kev

Legendary Radge
T20 pretty much guarantees drama right up until the end which the big TV companies will like. Mentioned it earlier but I’ve rarely seen a finish to a major sporting event than that last over at the 2016 T20 final 🤩
 

greencol

Skivin cooncil Radge
I don't follow the game much these days but played as an opening batsman and was actually on the books at Trent Bridge as a youngster. Clearly, the shorter versions of the game had to come, that's the world we live in where everything has to be instant gratification and 'now'. Like football, it often reflects society as a whole.

I enjoyed watching a bit of the televised The Hundred games. Lots of hyping up but good to see the way it brings interest for kids and the whole family. Evening T20 games are a bit of a drinkathon but that's fine, they have atmosphere. For me though I was brought up with Test Cricket and the County game. Longer versions of the game where you really see the full range of skills, the tactics and the strategies. I'd liken it in some ways to the difference between chess and drafts. I liked the traditional skills such as an opening bat 'getting his eye in' against the quick bowlers and taking the shine off the ball.

When the longer game was fashionable you'd see openers showing the full face of the bat to the ball for a while, aiming to hit everything straight between mid-on and mid-off for a while initially. They'd often cut loose later and show a full array of strokes, when set. In the short game they just have to throw the bat at everything, cross-batted 'silly' strokes from the first ball. But then they're mainly facing medium-pace trundlers anyway. The game has dumbed down greatly but it's fun and it really had to happen to save the future of the sport.
Which era when you were on the books Stu?
Garfield Sobers?
Richard Hadlee?
 

Stu

Maple Leaf Radge
Which era when you were on the books Stu?
Garfield Sobers?
Richard Hadlee?
It was the last couple or years of Gary Sobers' time at Notts, mate in 1973 and 1974. He was absolutely awesome and also a lovely, friendly man, even to a kid like me. He always had time to talk to a youngster. My latter memory of him was of him limping up the interior pavillon steps with his shot knees. The latter year I was there, some kitbags and equipment arrived in the dressing room. It was Clive Rice's kit sent over in advance and I still have his Transvaal cap somewhere. If I remember correctly Richard came along shortly afterwards. They, with the support of others like Derek Randall, Broad. Robinson, French and Hemmings made history very quickly. I read quite a few things about Gary's time in Nottingham over the years. He certainly liked the Joie de vivre and was a great pal of Jim Baxter when he played at Forest. They became known as 'Drunk and Sobers' and enjoyed themselve in the local night clubs.

Gary Sobers was a wonderful, natural cricketer who could do anything. For me the greatest of all time. Rice was fiery and hit the ball hard and straight - typical South African style. His pace bowling was hostile and a great foil tor Hadlee's supreme talent at the other end. Richard Hadlee, what can you say? When he came to Notts he was still primarily known at a fast bowler and would bowl off a very long run. That changed as he quickly adapted to conditions in this country - especially Trent Bridge, close to the River Trent with it's early morning green wickets. At first though, my god he was fast! I watched him practising, bowling in the nets and it was just fearsome. I've been fortunate to see some great fast bowlers from that period, Michael Holding, Andy Roberts, Dennis Lillee and so on. I swear I have never seen anybody quicker than Richard Hadlee in those early days. I sat at midwicket to watch him and the ball was just a red blurr, barely visible. He'd then come in to bat and club sixty or seventy runs to the boundary too. We were very lucky in Nottm to see three of the greatest all-rounders of all-time. Absolutely elite sportsman. Happy days.
 

joethehibby

Well-Known Radge
Thread starter
It was the last couple or years of Gary Sobers' time at Notts, mate in 1973 and 1974. He was absolutely awesome and also a lovely, friendly man, even to a kid like me. He always had time to talk to a youngster. My latter memory of him was of him limping up the interior pavillon steps with his shot knees. The latter year I was there, some kitbags and equipment arrived in the dressing room. It was Clive Rice's kit sent over in advance and I still have his Transvaal cap somewhere. If I remember correctly Richard came along shortly afterwards. They, with the support of others like Derek Randall, Broad. Robinson, French and Hemmings made history very quickly. I read quite a few things about Gary's time in Nottingham over the years. He certainly liked the Joie de vivre and was a great pal of Jim Baxter when he played at Forest. They became known as 'Drunk and Sobers' and enjoyed themselve in the local night clubs.

Gary Sobers was a wonderful, natural cricketer who could do anything. For me the greatest of all time. Rice was fiery and hit the ball hard and straight - typical South African style. His pace bowling was hostile and a great foil tor Hadlee's supreme talent at the other end. Richard Hadlee, what can you say? When he came to Notts he was still primarily known at a fast bowler and would bowl off a very long run. That changed as he quickly adapted to conditions in this country - especially Trent Bridge, close to the River Trent with it's early morning green wickets. At first though, my god he was fast! I watched him practising, bowling in the nets and it was just fearsome. I've been fortunate to see some great fast bowlers from that period, Michael Holding, Andy Roberts, Dennis Lillee and so on. I swear I have never seen anybody quicker than Richard Hadlee in those early days. I sat at midwicket to watch him and the ball was just a red blurr, barely visible. He'd then come in to bat and club sixty or seventy runs to the boundary too. We were very lucky in Nottm to see three of the greatest all-rounders of all-time. Absolutely elite sportsman. Happy days.
Good read that , all my friends and family say “Joe what are you watching that boring pish for”🤣
Eh , dont think so 😜
 

Doc Shrink

Retired Radge
Good read that , all my friends and family say “Joe what are you watching that boring pish for”🤣
Eh , dont think so 😜

I think it's boring pish too, although to be fair I've never watched more than a few minutes. Easily bored.

However, @Stu writing about it I find far more interesting and enjoyable!
Damned by faint praise eh!

Good piece Stu.
:sm127:
 

joethehibby

Well-Known Radge
Thread starter
I think it's boring pish too, although to be fair I've never watched more than a few minutes. Easily bored.

However, @Stu writing about it I find far more interesting and enjoyable!
Damned by faint praise eh!

Good piece Stu.
:sm127:
Its like american football , you have to PERSEVERE with it 🤷‍♂️
your not going to give up with hibs and their boring pish are you 🤣
 

Weehibbydrew

Mussel-bound Radge
Its like american football , you have to PERSEVERE with it 🤷‍♂️
your not going to give up with hibs and their boring pish are you 🤣
Agreed. I've had great days over the years at Test cricket at Lord's, the Oval, Old Trafford, Headingley and Eden Park. Never been to an ODI, will have to remedy that.
 
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