Career Change?

numptyploom

Just A Radge
Various roles within the job Kenny. Work with housing association offering solutions for their properties, the company has also just received a contract from Warmworks also offering solutions. My role with both of these would be to survey the properties and hand over heat loss calculations and recommendations to install. Previous to travel I started at university to become a chartered surveyor so I have a wee bit of knowledge, but equally ALOT I remember and learn fresh. I’ll also be supporting the install teams by supplying materials, so merchant runs, tidying up, buying the rolls etc! And there will be sales too, either to small builders for 1-10 new builds or retro fitting for private individuals. I’m trying not to get too enthusiastic yet as it somehow doesn’t feel ‘real’ yet, but I’ve been doing bits and pieces for a fortnight prior to starting full time start of June.

Also to say a massive thank you to anyone who has offered me support over the years in travel, it’s been very much appreciated. And Frutin as a company continues, my most excellent colleague Emma will still be available to offer advice and financially protected travel options, so if you do fancy a wee holiday sometime in the future, give her a shout, I know I will be.
Go for it. You must have had a dreadful time this last year and renewable energy is the way forward.
Good luck!
 

ZemmamasBarnet

Legendary Radge
Saw this thread come up and jumped in as I'm having the same train of thought. Didn't realise it was over 5 year old!

I got into what I'm doing (Financial Services) not because I wanted to but because I had responsibilities.

19 years later those responsibilities have come to an end and I'm looking at my lot thinking 'what now?'.

I absolutely cannot continue to do what I'm doing for a variety of reasons but predominantly selfishness. I'm bored, it doesn't pay a hell of a lot and it's going nowhere.

So I've gotten in touch with Napier Uni and West Lothian College with a view to learning / training for something else.
 

southfieldhibby

Aulder Than The Internet This Radge
Saw this thread come up and jumped in as I'm having the same train of thought. Didn't realise it was over 5 year old!

I got into what I'm doing (Financial Services) not because I wanted to but because I had responsibilities.

19 years later those responsibilities have come to an end and I'm looking at my lot thinking 'what now?'.

I absolutely cannot continue to do what I'm doing for a variety of reasons but predominantly selfishness. I'm bored, it doesn't pay a hell of a lot and it's going nowhere.

So I've gotten in touch with Napier Uni and West Lothian College with a view to learning / training for something else.
I think this is maybe more common a feeling than we realise, but maybe a lot of the time people feel too trapped to do anything about it, or simply can’t because of final implications.
Good luck with the change, hope it works out 💪
 

sockyboy

Just A Radge
I'd been in the building trade most of my working life and at age 38 decided I'd had enough of it. Studied social care at college for a year, then got a job with a large care company.
Very long story short, 10 years later started my own company in social care. Now emply 11 staff (2 are part time). Wouldn't say I enjoy every day but I certainly don't regret changing career. Best thing I ever did. *Best thing other than marrying Mrs Sockyboy (you never know who sees these)
 

Alberta Hibee

Just A Radge
Interesting to hear everyone's stories and also the pitfalls of moving job and age related job moves.
When I emigrated out here, there were no job related industries in the area, which I had in the UK.
I done courses in fitness and started my own wee company unfortunately I never got enough clientele.
One day I applied for a photo copier technician job, I got it and have never really looked back, some days is good ,some bad but it is varied, you get to see the countryside and surprisingly enough it's a kind of niche market where out here, techs are highly sought after.
Maybe look into it back in the UK if anyone is interested in it. And I'm certified on Canon, Konica Minolta, Lexmark and Toshiba machines.Im 8 to 5 Monday to Friday,so weekends are free.
Sorry for the long post if you reached this far.
 

aggie

Justified Radge
I submit my PhD thesis tomorrow.

I had been a labourer/hospitality body for my whole adult life until I was 35. When my daughter lost her mum suddenly when she was a baby (11 years ago now - fuck knows where the time goes...), I knew I couldn't be doing minimum wage shift work any more. So I went to Newbattle Abbey College to do an access course, with the rough idea of doing an English degree and becoming a teacher.

As it transpired, I was brighter than I thought, and ended up going all the way at uni, as it were. I toyed with becoming an academic, but at my age and in my situation, I didn't have the stomach for the modern Hunger Games that is the academic job market - I couldn't face 5 years or more of badly paid temporary contracts. So I thought I better think outside the box.

Since September, I have been on a graduate programme doing company research for an investment company (apologies to the resident communists). Me and nine 25-yr-olds, which is pretty funny sometimes in its own right. But it's very well paid, will make me and Christina financially safe, and even possibly help me become a homeowner in the next 5 years or so. It's not my dream job or anything, but it's varied, my colleagues are all very intelligent, and the perks are outstanding.

My point is this, and I make it while fully acknowledging were it not for the loss of C's mum, I'd probably still be sitting on my hands too, waiting for the "right path" to come to me in a blinding flash:

If you're dissatisfied, don't wait. Life is not a dress rehearsal, you don't get another go.

Just make the best changes/decisions you can think of, taking into account whatever your responsibilities and priorities are, and in the full knowledge that there's never going to be a perfect option. I'm a long way from where I was 11 years ago, and have thought about a couple of possible outcomes along the way. If you'd have told me back then where I'd end up now, I'd have thought it completely implausible.

But if you just push at life's doors a bit, things will inevitable unfold that you couldn't possibly plan.

Just don't wait! (Especially if like me you're already solidly middle-aged!)
 
I submit my PhD thesis tomorrow.

I had been a labourer/hospitality body for my whole adult life until I was 35. When my daughter lost her mum suddenly when she was a baby (11 years ago now - fuck knows where the time goes...), I knew I couldn't be doing minimum wage shift work any more. So I went to Newbattle Abbey College to do an access course, with the rough idea of doing an English degree and becoming a teacher.

As it transpired, I was brighter than I thought, and ended up going all the way at uni, as it were. I toyed with becoming an academic, but at my age and in my situation, I didn't have the stomach for the modern Hunger Games that is the academic job market - I couldn't face 5 years or more of badly paid temporary contracts. So I thought I better think outside the box.

Since September, I have been on a graduate programme doing company research for an investment company (apologies to the resident communists). Me and nine 25-yr-olds, which is pretty funny sometimes in its own right. But it's very well paid, will make me and Christina financially safe, and even possibly help me become a homeowner in the next 5 years or so. It's not my dream job or anything, but it's varied, my colleagues are all very intelligent, and the perks are outstanding.

My point is this, and I make it while fully acknowledging were it not for the loss of C's mum, I'd probably still be sitting on my hands too, waiting for the "right path" to come to me in a blinding flash:

If you're dissatisfied, don't wait. Life is not a dress rehearsal, you don't get another go.

Just make the best changes/decisions you can think of, taking into account whatever your responsibilities and priorities are, and in the full knowledge that there's never going to be a perfect option. I'm a long way from where I was 11 years ago, and have thought about a couple of possible outcomes along the way. If you'd have told me back then where I'd end up now, I'd have thought it completely implausible.

But if you just push at life's doors a bit, things will inevitable unfold that you couldn't possibly plan.

Just don't wait! (Especially if like me you're already solidly middle-aged!)
While the tragic circumstances which were the catalyst for your journey will never change Ian, your can console yourself in a small way that her beautiful legacy has a wonderful, inspirational Dad.
Stick in at the job you Capitalist Hyena you. Your big Communist pal.

BIG G
 
Last edited:

Gareth

Well-Known Radge
I submit my PhD thesis tomorrow.

I had been a labourer/hospitality body for my whole adult life until I was 35. When my daughter lost her mum suddenly when she was a baby (11 years ago now - fuck knows where the time goes...), I knew I couldn't be doing minimum wage shift work any more. So I went to Newbattle Abbey College to do an access course, with the rough idea of doing an English degree and becoming a teacher.

As it transpired, I was brighter than I thought, and ended up going all the way at uni, as it were. I toyed with becoming an academic, but at my age and in my situation, I didn't have the stomach for the modern Hunger Games that is the academic job market - I couldn't face 5 years or more of badly paid temporary contracts. So I thought I better think outside the box.

Since September, I have been on a graduate programme doing company research for an investment company (apologies to the resident communists). Me and nine 25-yr-olds, which is pretty funny sometimes in its own right. But it's very well paid, will make me and Christina financially safe, and even possibly help me become a homeowner in the next 5 years or so. It's not my dream job or anything, but it's varied, my colleagues are all very intelligent, and the perks are outstanding.

My point is this, and I make it while fully acknowledging were it not for the loss of C's mum, I'd probably still be sitting on my hands too, waiting for the "right path" to come to me in a blinding flash:

If you're dissatisfied, don't wait. Life is not a dress rehearsal, you don't get another go.

Just make the best changes/decisions you can think of, taking into account whatever your responsibilities and priorities are, and in the full knowledge that there's never going to be a perfect option. I'm a long way from where I was 11 years ago, and have thought about a couple of possible outcomes along the way. If you'd have told me back then where I'd end up now, I'd have thought it completely implausible.

But if you just push at life's doors a bit, things will inevitable unfold that you couldn't possibly plan.

Just don't wait! (Especially if like me you're already solidly middle-aged!)
Thats brilliant Aggie, its big moment handing it in. Sounds like an amazing journey and incredible to think that your hand was forced and then to see where you went. At the risk of overblowing it, I think your life is an example of what Jimmy Reid talked about in his rectorial address.
" I am convinced that the great mass of our people go through life without even a glimmer of what they could have contributed to their fellow human beings. This is a personal tragedy. It is a social crime. The flowering of each individual’s personality and talents is the precondition for everyone’s development". Seems you might be an example of the 'organic intellectual' Aggie, though I'm sure you'll hate me saying that
 

hibbybilly

radge grandad radge
I submit my PhD thesis tomorrow.

I had been a labourer/hospitality body for my whole adult life until I was 35. When my daughter lost her mum suddenly when she was a baby (11 years ago now - fuck knows where the time goes...), I knew I couldn't be doing minimum wage shift work any more. So I went to Newbattle Abbey College to do an access course, with the rough idea of doing an English degree and becoming a teacher.

As it transpired, I was brighter than I thought, and ended up going all the way at uni, as it were. I toyed with becoming an academic, but at my age and in my situation, I didn't have the stomach for the modern Hunger Games that is the academic job market - I couldn't face 5 years or more of badly paid temporary contracts. So I thought I better think outside the box.

Since September, I have been on a graduate programme doing company research for an investment company (apologies to the resident communists). Me and nine 25-yr-olds, which is pretty funny sometimes in its own right. But it's very well paid, will make me and Christina financially safe, and even possibly help me become a homeowner in the next 5 years or so. It's not my dream job or anything, but it's varied, my colleagues are all very intelligent, and the perks are outstanding.

My point is this, and I make it while fully acknowledging were it not for the loss of C's mum, I'd probably still be sitting on my hands too, waiting for the "right path" to come to me in a blinding flash:

If you're dissatisfied, don't wait. Life is not a dress rehearsal, you don't get another go.

Just make the best changes/decisions you can think of, taking into account whatever your responsibilities and priorities are, and in the full knowledge that there's never going to be a perfect option. I'm a long way from where I was 11 years ago, and have thought about a couple of possible outcomes along the way. If you'd have told me back then where I'd end up now, I'd have thought it completely implausible.

But if you just push at life's doors a bit, things will inevitable unfold that you couldn't possibly plan.

Just don't wait! (Especially if like me you're already solidly middle-aged!)
Well done aggie, and I hope things are getting better for you mate. By the way, Christina was my Maws name, your lassie is the only other Christina I know of. Lovely name buddy. 😊
 

aggie

Justified Radge
Thats brilliant Aggie, its big moment handing it in. Sounds like an amazing journey and incredible to think that your hand was forced and then to see where you went. At the risk of overblowing it, I think your life is an example of what Jimmy Reid talked about in his rectorial address.
" I am convinced that the great mass of our people go through life without even a glimmer of what they could have contributed to their fellow human beings. This is a personal tragedy. It is a social crime. The flowering of each individual’s personality and talents is the precondition for everyone’s development". Seems you might be an example of the 'organic intellectual' Aggie, though I'm sure you'll hate me saying that
Quite the contrary, G, I am in fact a great admirer of Gramsci's work, and indeed much "leftist" thought in general. I consider that a very great compliment, the idea of the 'organic intellectual' is a great and noble aspiration – thank you.
And I agree wholeheartedly with Reid's sentiments – it is a social crime. But I also think that the solution cannot simply come from social and/or political movements or machinations - in fact, if people abdicate their individual responsibility, then such movements will necessarily be ultimately futile.
Jacques Rancière wrote that we must 'learn how to be equal men in an unequal society. That is what being emancipated means.' He also said that 'equality is not given, nor is it claimed; it is practiced, it is verified', and I agree with him. Oppression and injustice exists, but that doesn't mean we have teach people (even tacitly) that they are preordained victims, of circumstance or in general.
And that doesn't mean I'm a 'deserving poor' Tory, or indeed that I swallow any 'American Dream' nonsense - I agree with George Carlin on that point: 'it's called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it'. I mean it more in the sense of a 'philosophical responsibility' to oneself, almost. Aaaaaanyway!
Big day tomorrow, still lots to do!
(PS online-only submissions, so no lolly at the school office, and no post-submission shindig in the pub - I feel robbed! Damn this pandemic.)
 

aggie

Justified Radge
Well done aggie, and I hope things are getting better for you mate. By the way, Christina was my Maws name, your lassie is the only other Christina I know of. Lovely name buddy. 😊
My granny's name, a formidable woman and 2nd-generation immigrant Polish Jew, who still lives by herself on McDonald Road at the grand old age of nearly 99. A role model for my lass if ever there was on :)
 
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